Coronavirus (COVID-19) information: All courses at all locations are available as live online classes. Limited in-person classes in some locations. Our offices remain open. Learn more.

×

After Effects Classes NYC

After Effects classes & training in NYC

AGI has been teaching After Effects classes in NYC for more than a decade and offers public After Effects courses and private After Effects training in New York City or live online. About our NYC After Effects courses:

  • Hands-on classes led by experienced effects and animation pros.
  • Learn directly from the authors of the best-selling After Effects Digital Classroom book.
  • Small, personalized classes with real-world projects.
  • Available in our Midtown NYC training center, live online, or at your location.
  • Private and customized After Effects training available.
  • Trusted by HBO, NBC, and all major sport leagues to train their staff.

After Effects Classes in NYC Offered

Attend introductory to advanced After Effects Classes in NYC in our training centers, online, or at your office. We have been teaching After Effects classes in NYC for more than a decade and can help you to achieve professional results faster and more efficiently.

After Effects Classes in NYC Course Details and Outlines

After Effects Level 1 (NYC or Online)

This After Effects training will take you from the basics of After Effects such as understanding the workspace and basic animation techniques, all the way through to advanced animation techniques, motion tracking, and particle effects. Work on hands-on projects to hone your skills in animation.

Motion Graphics Certificate in NYC

Skill up and learn to create amazing motion graphics using Adobe After Effects and Premiere Pro in this hands-on certificate program. Understand how these programs work together and workflow strategies to create fully-animated motion graphics. Work on real projects in hands-on training in motion graphics.

After Effects in a Day in NYC

Get started in After Effects with this 1-day, hands-on course. Get comfortable with the user interface, work with the timeline, interface, and layers, animate logos, add transitions, and more.

After Effects Level 2 in NYC

Master After Effects to create engaging motion graphics, animations, and visual effects with hands-on training. Learn with hands-on projects in this advanced After Effects class. Learn to integrate live footage and graphics, create animations, add visual effects, and more.

After Effects Training Class - Introduction

In this two-day After Effects class you will learn the foundation skills needed to create exciting visual effects and motion graphics. This After Effects course is taught by the team behind the comprehensive book, After Effects Digital Classroom. In this After Effects class, you'll cover topics starting with the use of the interface, using layers, keyframes, and masking, and media management. You will also have the opportunity to explore the depth of the After Effects tools, including 3D effects and rendering your project for output.

After Effects Training Class - Advanced

In this two-day Advanced After Effects Class you will discover advanced skills needed for creating visual effects and motion graphics. Our After Effects courses are led by the team that writes the best-selling After Effects Digital Classroom. In this course you learn advanced compositing, the timeline, selections, color correction, color keying, motion tracking, expressions, environmental effects, and more.

After Effects Bootcamp

This four-day comprehensive After Effects training provides introductory through advanced skills for creating effects, animations, and motion graphics. This bootcamp combines our introductory through advanced After Effects classes into four consecutive days, providing you with an intensive multi-day workshop. The material covered is identical to the introductory and advanced After Effects courses, but is delivered in a single week. You start by learning essential After Effects skills and end the week with a full set of experience across a wide range of effects, color correction, compositing, and many other skills.

Upcoming Dates for After Effects Classes in NYC

All classes are led by a live instructor. Class times listed are Eastern time.

Course Name Course Dates Location Fee Register
Weekdays
Mon, Nov 2 2020 to
Tue, Nov 3 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
Online
Live instructor-led class online
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $795.00
Weekdays
Mon, Nov 2 2020 to
Wed, Nov 18 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
New York
American Graphics Institute
AGI Training New York
185 Madison Av.
New York, NY 10016
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $975.00
Weekdays
Mon, Nov 2 2020 to
Thu, Nov 5 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
Online
Live instructor-led class online
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $1,590.00
Weekdays
Wed, Nov 4 2020 to
Thu, Nov 5 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
Online
Live instructor-led class online
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $795.00
Weekdays
Mon, Nov 9 2020 to
Wed, Nov 11 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
New York
American Graphics Institute
AGI Training New York
185 Madison Av.
New York, NY 10016
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $975.00
Weekdays
Mon, Nov 16 2020 to
Wed, Nov 18 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
New York
American Graphics Institute
AGI Training New York
185 Madison Av.
New York, NY 10016
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $975.00
Weekdays
Mon, Nov 23 2020 to
Tue, Nov 24 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
Online
Live instructor-led class online
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $795.00
Weekdays
Mon, Dec 7 2020 to
Tue, Dec 8 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
Online
Live instructor-led class online
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $795.00
Weekdays
Mon, Dec 7 2020 to
Thu, Dec 10 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
Online
Live instructor-led class online
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $1,590.00
Weekdays
Wed, Dec 9 2020 to
Thu, Dec 10 2020

10:00 am to 5:00 pm
American Graphics Institute American Graphics Institute
Online
Live instructor-led class online
1969-12-31T19:00:00-05:00 $795.00

After Effects Classes in NYC

After Effects Classes in NYC at American Graphics Institute.
American Graphics Institute’s After Effects Classes in NYC are held in midtown Manhattan with a live instructor in the classroom.
About After Effects Classes in New York

American Graphics Institute has been delivering public and private After Effects Classes in NYC for more than 15 years. We have provided private After Effects training to both the New York Times and NY Daily News, along with many ad agencies and design firms in NYC. Our many clients include companies of all sizes, non-profit agencies, and educational institutions. AGI provides After Effects training to employees working in marketing, communications, design and a variety of business roles.

Instructors teaching After Effects Classes in NYC at American Graphics Institute.
Highly qualified instructors teach After Effects Classes in NYC and are available for private After Effects training.
After Effects Courses in NYC from expert instructors

The instructors in that lead our After Effects Classes in New York are the authors of many books on After Effects, ranging from the After Effects Digital Classroom, to the Adobe Creative Cloud for Dummies book. American Graphics Institute teachers are also available for private After Effects training in and around NYC.

Understanding After Effects

Adobe After Effects is widely used in animation as well as post-production of video. It is used to create animation, motion graphics, and visual effects. These can be used in broadcast TV, video, on the web, in-store displays, and kiosks.

Using After Affects you can create and stylize 2D footage in a 3D space. After Effects can be used to design titles, create cartoon characters, and apply animation. Although it can do all these things, it is not the same as video editing software. This program is best used to apply effects after the footage has been edited, or to create animation and motion graphics from otherwise static objects. It is a tool for storytelling, creating visually appealing motion graphics that integrate into any medium to enhance a presentation, story, image, or mood.

The primary uses of After Effects can be divided into three categories: Animation, Effects, and compositing

The specific type of animation for which After Effects is mostly used is known as Motion Graphics, which involves creating motion and movement of traditionally static objects such as logos, text, and other graphic elements.

The type of Effects, sometimes called visual effects (VFX) are well known from film and video. Adding snow to a video scene, creating fire or water, making objects appear to turn into liquid are all examples of effects. You can use After Effects to create these visual effects from your own video.

After Effects is also used for digital compositing, which involves assembling multiple videos into a single product. Whether the videos are layered on top of each other, or in separate corners of a screen, After Effects makes it possible to merge together multiple videos using compositing.

Who uses After Effects?

It is used by visual artists, animators, advertising agencies, video artists, video editors, visual designers, social media professionals, video producers, motion graphics designers, UX professionals, and animators.

After Effects is the industry-standard software application for creating visual effects and motion graphics and can be purchased on its own or as part of the Adobe Creative Cloud. Gaining proficiency in After Effects program comes from in-depth training such as the hands-on courses at American Graphics Institute, and through practice and use creating projects.

After Effects for TV and video graphics

After Effects started as a program for graphics professionals to create high quality video for broadcast on television and it still is an important tool for broadcast-design professionals today. Walk into just about any post-production facility, advertising agency or motion graphic design studio in New York or Los Angeles and you will find After Effects being used to create original content for video such as lower-thirds, bumpers, commercials, and title treatments. Many video professionals consider it an essential tool in their daily work for both motion graphics creations and compositing. In fact, you can see it in use by networks in NYC such as MTV, NBC, Spike, truTV, and the Food Network, where it’s used to produce stunning, high quality graphics and motion design packages quickly and affordably.

After Effects for creating Web Content

Companies of all sizes use the Internet as marketing and public relations tools and it is an excellent medium for displaying high quality motion graphics created using After Effects.

Whether user-created content being shared on YouTube and Vimeo, or professional level content created for Netflix and Hulu, After Effects has a place in online content creation..

After Effects for presentation graphics

Digital displays, such as high-definition televisions, monitors, and projectors, are some other areas where motion graphics is displayed. Whether you walk into a Midtown NYC bank and see a display with an animated logo, or attend a NY Rangers game at Madison Square Garden and see animation on the scoreboard, you are viewing After Effects in action. After Effects is used to add impact to otherwise static objects. This can also involve corporate presentations with animation for slides, charts, and graphs. With the proliferation and affordability of high-definition televisions and other digital displays, many public venues, such as malls, retail stores, schools, and even military bases, are using motion graphics to both inform and entertain.

Understanding the After Effects animation workflow

There are some general principles for animation, motion design, and compositing projects that are helpful to understand when using After Effects. Most video and animation projects can be divided into three distinct phases; pre-production, production, and post-production. Keep in mind that each project is different, and depending on the scope and size, some of these stages, such as production and post-production, might be consolidated. For many designers, the distribution step only involves determining the technical specifications for distribution.

Pre-production

Pre-production is the planning or organizational phase of a project. Once a designer is brought on, one of the first jobs that he or she will often have involves idea generation. For narrative projects, this is the point at which the script will be written and the look and feel of characters, background, props and other elements is developed. Additionally, at this stage storyboards might be created. Storyboards are graphical representations used to visualize a project and are commonly used as visual organizers to conceptualize the flow of a motion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive project. If a project is to utilize a voiceover or accompanying music, it will often be created at this point before the actual animation work begins.

Production

For many animators and designers this is the main phase of a project. During this phase the assets that will be used in the animation are created. Depending on the type of project you are working on, these assets might include logos, characters, backgrounds or even abstract graphical elements. Once sufficient elements have been created, the layout and animation work can begin. When working on a project that will utilize After Effects, this often starts with creating layout mockups in Photoshop or Illustrator that can later be incorporated into your After Effects project files. The actual animation is usually what takes up the most amount of time during the production phase.

Post-production

When working on video projects, the post-production phase is extremely important, since this is where the editing, compositing, audio mixing and finishing occur. However, when working on smaller animation or motion design projects, the production and post-production phases can be consolidated. For larger projects, the After Effects animator might not be involved in this phase at all.

Digital video basics for using After Effects

Successfully producing graphics for video and other media requires that you understand a few technical requirements. If you don’t understand these, you’ll merely be pushing buttons and clicking checkboxes, so you should take a few minutes to at least give yourself some foundational knowledge regarding digital video.

When working in After Effects, you will want to consider the final destination for your project. Will it be used on television, in video, on a mobile device? Knowing this information allows you to accurately create your After Effects content to match your intended destination. Projects for high-definition broadcast television differ from those for a portable device with a small-screen or from those produced solely for display on a computer screen. Each of these media has its own standards for items, such as frame rate, aspect ratio, and bit rate. Understanding these items saves you time and effort in the production process.

Understanding video formats

Some video formats are common for professional video production, while others are suitable only for broadband or small-screen purposes. There are two main standards used for world–wide broadcast television, a handful of competing standards for desktop and web video, and a series of device-specific standards used in mobile handheld devices. Technical standards, such as the ones touched upon here, are very complex. In general, regardless of the platform for which you are creating video content, there are three main properties to keep in mind:

Dimensions: This property specifies the pixel dimensions of a video file—the number of pixels horizontally and vertically that make up an image or video frame. This value is usually written as a pair of numbers separated by an x, where the first number is the horizontal value and the second represents the vertical value, such as 720 × 480. The term Pixel is a combination of the words picture and element and is the smallest individual component in a digital image. Whether you are dealing with a still image or working with video frames makes no difference; everything displayed on-screen is made up of pixels. The dimensions of a video or still image file determine its aspect ratio; that is, the proportion of an image’s horizontal units to its vertical ones. Usually written in the following format: horizontal units:vertical units, the two most common aspect ratios seen in current video displays are 4:3 and 16:9.

Frame rate: This property specifies the number of individual images that make up each second of video. Frame rate is measured as a value of fps, which is an acronym that stands for frames per second.

Pixel aspect ratio: This property specifies the shape of the pixels that make up an image. Pixels are the smallest part of a digital image, and different display devices, such as televisions and computer monitors, have pixels with different horizontal and vertical proportions.

When producing graphics for broadcast television, you have to conform to a specific set of formats and standards. For example, you need to know whether your graphics will be displayed on high-definition screens (1080i, 1080p, 720p), standard-definition screens, or mobile devices because this affects the size that you must create your graphics at. Similarly, you need to know whether you’re in a region that broadcasts using the ATSC (often still called NTSC) or PAL standards, since this affects both the size you can create your graphics at, and the frame rate and pixel aspect ratio you will need to use. If you are producing animation or video for the Web, you’ll need to know the format that the distributing site will use: Flash, Silverlight, H.264, or other, since certain video effects don’t work well when exported to certain formats.

ATSC

In the United States, the ATSC, or Advanced Television Systems Committee, has issued a set of standards for the transmission of digital television. These standards have replaced the older, analog NTSC (National Television Standards Committee) formats. The standards embraced by the ATSC include standard-definition and high-definition display resolutions, aspect ratios, and frame rates. All broadcast video and graphics must conform to one of the ATSC standards. Information on the various ATSC standards is available on their website at ATSC.org.

High-definition television

While high-definition (HD) television technology has existed for decades, it wasn’t until the beginning of the 21st century that it came to the attention of the average American television viewer. The term HD is used to describe video that has a higher resolution than traditional television systems, which are called SD, or standard definition. There several high-definition standards for broadcast television, including 720p, 1080i, and 4K, with some televisions, gaming consoles (Playstation 3, Xbox 360, and more) and Blu-ray disc players supporting 1080p. The letters p and I refer to whether the format uses a progressive or an interlaced display method. Interlacing divides each frame of video into two separate fields. When combined, these two fields form a single video frame that shows a single image. Progressive display forgoes fields and has each individual frame as its own unique image. In general, progressive displays are clearer and better defined, while interlaced displays require less broadcast bandwidth to be transmitted to the viewer. Most modern video cameras allow the user to choose whether to record in a progressive or interlaced format.

Standard-definition television

Contrary to some beliefs, standard definition footage is still in use today. Simply compare the number of cable television channels that are available in high definition to those that are not. Prior to the invention of high definition, there was only one broadcast standard in the United States, NTSC (National Television Systems Committee), which included settings for the display of video in both 4:3 and 16:9 aspect ratios. While technically it has been replaced by the ATSC standards, the term NTSC is still used by most video cameras as well as many editing and graphics applications when referring to standard-definition, broadcast-quality video.

NTSC and NTSC widescreen: Graphics applications designed to produce content for broadcast, such as Adobe After Effects, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and more, include pre-built settings for creating video projects called presets that correspond with the most commonly used broadcast standards. The NTSC presets include settings for both a standard (4:3) and widescreen (16:9) aspect ratio. They use the same dimensions, 720 × 480, but different pixel aspect ratios, and this is what accounts for the difference in shape. Devices that comply with the NTSC standard use a frame rate of 29.97 frames per second.

PAL

PAL, or Phase Alternating Line, is the standard for broadcast television used throughout Europe and much of the rest of the world outside of North America. PAL differs from NTSC in several key ways, including dimensions and frame rate. It uses a frame rate of 25 fps, which is closer to the 24 fps used in film, and like NTSC, it has both a standard and widescreen setting.

PAL and PAL widescreen: In applications such as After Effects, the PAL presets include both a standard (4:3) and a widescreen (16:9) aspect ratio. Much like their NTSC equivalents, they use the same pixel dimensions; in this case, 720 × 576, but each have different pixel aspect ratios.

Web and mobile device video

You can use After Effects to crate video for web and mobile distribution. Although there is no single standard for video on the Web or on mobile devices, there is only a handful of competing audio/video formats. QuickTime, Windows Media Video and H.264 are the main video formats. The QuickTime format is controlled by Apple Inc., and for years was the de facto standard for web-delivered video. The freely available QuickTime Player is compatible with both Windows and Mac OS and is used to view QuickTime Movie (.MOV) and other video file formats. QuickTime format video is also supported on some mobile devices; most notably the Apple suite of phones, iPods and iPads.

Windows Media Video, often called WMV, is the Microsoft standard made by the creators of the Windows operating system. A variation of WMV is used for Silverlight video, which is widely used by many professional media organizations, including NBC Sports for their live Olympics coverage and Netflix for streaming videos. Windows Media is also a supported format on some multimedia players and mobile devices, such as Windows phones.

Even outside of web video distribution, H.264 is a standard for high-definition video compression on a variety of platforms and devices. This format was created by MPEG LA and derived from the MPEG-4 standard while OGG Theora is its open source alternative currently controlled by Google. Mobile devices, such as the Apple iPod, Sony PlayStation vita, Windows and Android tablets, and some HTML5-compliant browsers, support variations of H.264, along with many mobile phones and third-party video playback applications, such as QuickTime Player, Flash Player, and the VLC Media Player. As with all technology, the mobile video market is constantly changing and developing. As these standards evolve and grow, browser and device support will fluctuate, and After Effects continues to evolve and gain support for new and emerging standards.

Film

In addition to its use in producing television and web video, After Effects contains presets intended to be used in film post-production as well. This application can import and output digital video at both 2K and 4K resolutions. 4K is the term used to describe video that has a resolution above 4000 horizontal pixels; this is more than double the size of 1080P high definition footage. This means you can produce visual effects and graphics in After Effects that are on par with high quality film productions.

Understanding frame rate and resolution

Video is essentially a series of individual still images that are displayed very quickly, one after the other. The frame rate of video is measured by the number of frames recorded or played back each second, and it is denoted as fps, an acronym that stands for frames per second. Different video standards have different frame rates, and many video standards support a variety of different frame rates. As a comparison, American television is broadcast at 30 fps, PAL uses 25 fps, and film uses a frame rate of 24 fps.

If you have a background in graphic design, you might be familiar with the term resolution, which refers to the pixel density or the number of pixels in a given space. As such, in North America, resolution is denoted in pixels per inch or ppi. For example, images created for printing in high-quality magazines are usually 300 ppi, while images created for use on a web site usually have a resolution of 72 ppi. When working with video, ppi is not used to address resolution. When discussing video, the term resolution is used to refer to the pixel dimensions of an image: the number of horizontal and vertical pixels that make up the actual image. When creating graphics for the Web, these pixel dimensions determine the relative size of content to the overall video frame size.

Graphics that are used in video are created using the RGB color mode. Each individual pixel is assigned a unique color value consisting of combinations of red, green, and blue. Each of these colors is saved to its own color channel. When colors are combined, the composite (a full color image) is created. In addition to the color channels of an image, some formats can also contain an additional channel that holds information about the areas of an image that are transparent. This channel is called the alpha channel. If you also work in Photoshop, you might already be familiar with alpha channels, although the meaning of an alpha channel in video is somewhat different. In Photoshop, any saved selection is called an alpha channel, and you can have up to 99 alpha channels. In After Effects, as in other applications designed to work with video, the term alpha channel refers specifically to the transparency of a still image or video file. Alpha channels use the 256 shades of gray to represent transparency. When looking at an alpha channel in most applications, black pixels represent those that are fully transparent, white pixels are fully opaque, and gray pixels represent semi-transparent areas. Only some image and video formats support saving alpha channels along with the other image information. Commonly used file formats that can include alpha channels are: Tagged Image File Format (.tiff ), TARGA (Truevision Advanced Raster Graphics Adapter, .tga), PNG (Portable Network Graphic), QuickTime (.mov), and AVI (Audio Video Interleave). Alpha channels are automatically created for the transparent areas of native Photoshop and Illustrator files when they are imported into an After Effects project

Primary Panels in After Effects

If you are considering taking an After Effects course, you will be learning about the many panels used in the After Effects interface. Here we describe many of the panels you’ll be using when creating motion graphics, compositing video, or visual effects.

Composition: The Composition panel is one of the most important panels in After Effects. It is the preview window and the main animation space that you work in when building an After Effects project. You can build your animated projects in this panel, and it has features you can use to change how your composition previews. Perhaps you want to create, show, or hide guidelines. Or maybe you need to isolate the alpha channel of your composition so that you can see which areas are transparent and which are opaque. This can all be accomplished in the Composition panel. In this exercise, you will work with the Composition panel to change the preview resolution of the display and learn how to reveal a composition’s alpha channel.

Effects Controls Panel: Use the Effect Controls panel to edit effects you have applied to layers in your Compositions. While this panel is not a part of the Standard workspace, you can access it using the Window menu by choosing Window > Effect Controls or by double-clicking any effect displayed under a layer on the Timeline. To access effects you have applied to a layer, you must first select the layer by clicking it in either the Timeline or Composition panels, or by using a keyboard shortcut. The layer numbers in your active composition correspond to the digits on the number pad if you are using a full-size keyboard. If you do not have a layer selected, or if the selected layer doesn’t have any effects applied to it, this panel remains blank.

After Effects Flowchart Panel: The Flowchart panel provides an organizational chart, or a graphical representation of the relationship between compositions and footage items in your After Effects project. The Flowchart panel is a passive tool that displays the relationship between elements in your project; you cannot use it to change those relationships. This panel can come in handy when working with very complex animations that might contain multiple nested compositions. To view the flowchart for a Composition, you must first select that composition in the Project panel or make it the active Comp in the Timeline, then chose Composition > Composition Flowchart.

The After Effects Footage panel: When working in After Effects, you will use the Footage panel to preview individual pieces of footage. Double-clicking any piece of imported media in your Project panel causes it to preview in the Footage panel. You can also use the drop-down menu at the top of the panel to choose footage to preview.

The After Effects Layer panel: Once added to a Composition in the Timeline panel, a footage item becomes a layer inside of that comp. In fact, any item that is added to a Composition becomes a new layer; this can include audio, video, text, solids, lights, cameras, and more. One of the aspects you will get used to when working in this application is that every item in the Timeline panel is its own independent layer. Double-clicking a footage layer in the Composition panel opens it in the Layer panel. A footage layer contains a file that has been imported into the Project panel, as opposed to an item that is created in After Effects, such as text or a composition. Some effects, such as paint, motion tracking, and stabilization, cannot be applied in the Composition window but must instead be applied in the Layer panel. Here, you will explore the Layer panel.

The Project panel in After Effects: The Project panel contains references to all the footage files (video, audio, and images) that you have imported into your After Effects Project. It also contains all the Compositions that you have created in your current project. The media items are denoted as references because of the way the program treats imported files. When imported, your media files remain in their original location on your hard-drive; After Effects creates a link to them. If these files are modified outside After Effects, the application generates a new preview and updates your project accordingly. This linking system is helpful because you can still manipulate imported objects in their original programs, such as editing an image in Photoshop. While very useful, linking files in this way can also cause problems: if you move, rename, or delete your original media files, After Effects will lose the link, and it will be unable to display the content. When working with imported media files in After Effects, you should always remember where the files are located and what their names are, because your project files need to be able to locate the objects you import to display them.

The Render Queue Panel in After Effects: Once you have completed your animation, you use the Render Queue panel to produce, or render, your project to deliver it for final output. Whether you are producing content for broadcast or broadband distribution, the Render Queue is your tool for exporting. You can use this panel to add multiple compositions, set the render options and destinations for each, and then render the compositions sequentially.

After Effects Timeline panel: The Timeline panel is one of the main panels used for creating animations. Each composition has its own independent Timeline panel, where you can animate layer and effects properties, position layers in time, and change the layer blending modes.  When working with two-dimensional layers, the stacking order of the layers controls which layers appear farthest back, or behind, the other layers.  The Current Time Indicator, also called the playhead, is the red vertical line that runs perpendicular to the Time Ruler. It indicates the current frame that is being displayed, moving as the animation or composition is played. The default display of the Timeline panel is the layer bar mode. It displays the composition time as a Time Ruler across the top of the panel, while layer names and properties are displayed to the left. The layer bar mode can also be switched so that the panel displays the Graph Editor, an advanced tool for animation that allows for more precise control of animated properties. Here, you will work with the Timeline.

Benefits of After Effects Courses with AGI

With all of the panels and complex capabilities, it's understandable that you may want help learning After Effects. AGI classes make After Effects easy to understand through hands-on practice and real-world exercises. Our proprietary curriculum developed by our expert instructors is included with the class, as our project files and the ability to re-take the class at no additional cost for a full year. Our five-star reviews from past clients make it clear that After Effects classes are a highly effective way to learn After Effects.

Other Resources for Learning After Effects

AGI also offers free After Effects tutorials including tutorials to help you understand the After Effects Workspace as well as help finding missing files in After Effects. These are all created by the instructors that teach our After Effects courses.

AGI's team of experienced instructors are led by the design and usability expert and best-selling author of more than 20 books including Creative Cloud for Dummies, Creative Suite for Dummies, and Photoshop Digital Classroom. Classes are led by experienced professionals who have extensive professional and training experience, and also work in our consulting practice areas and as practicing professionals. For Federal agencies, American Graphics Institute classes are offered under GSA contract 47QTCA19D003Y.